A familiar, common reoccurring problem in pond and lake management is nutrient loading causing duckweed or algae blooms.
The best solution or remedy for these problems usually lays in the overall land management practices. If fertilizer and pesticides are running directly into a water body we identify this as point source pollution, a primary cause of the duckweed or algae.

The second most common problem is sediment loading, which reduces the depth of the water body and raises the average summer water temperature. Sediment loading may be a result of poor storm water management. To determine depth a bathymetric survey must be performed and charted to create a depth profile to inform the efficacy and economics of dredging and aeration systems.

This condition may require mechanical or hydraulic dredging to establish greater depth and to restore proper inversion on the laminar flow (of the water column) to sustain cooler summer temperatures.

Some relief can be realized by installation of bottom aeration systems (see https://lake-savers.com) in conjunction with biological applications. These very effective systems of course require electric service.  Pesticide solutions are not recommended, as they are temporary fixes and must continually be applied, placing other aquatic and terrestrial organisms at risk.

In a perfect world, analysis and inventory of the watershed provides information necessary to develop a workable plan or design to improve both the water quality and appearance of your pond or lake. Consult a professional before you commit resources ($) to fix your problem.

Jay Archer

Landscape Ecologist, Designer & President

Green Jay Landscaping

914-560-6570